The Resource A disease called childhood : why ADHD became an American epidemic, Marilyn Wedge, PhD

A disease called childhood : why ADHD became an American epidemic, Marilyn Wedge, PhD

Label
A disease called childhood : why ADHD became an American epidemic
Title
A disease called childhood
Title remainder
why ADHD became an American epidemic
Statement of responsibility
Marilyn Wedge, PhD
Title variation
A disease called childhood
Title variation remainder
why attention deficit hyperactivity disorder became an American epidemic
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
In 1987, only 3 percent of American children were diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, also known as ADHD. By 2000, that number jumped to 7 percent, and in 2014 the number rose to an alarming 11 percent. To combat the disorder, two thirds of these children, some as young as three years old, are prescribed powerful stimulant drugs like Ritalin and Adderall to help them cope with symptoms. Meanwhile, ADHD rates have remained relatively low in other countries such as France, Finland, and the United Kingdom, and Japan, where the number of children diagnosed with and medicated for ADHD is a measly 1 percent or less. Alarmed by this trend, family therapist Marilyn Wedge set out to understand how ADHD became an American epidemic. If ADHD were a true biological disorder of the brain, why was the rate of diagnosis so much higher in America than it was abroad? Was a child's inattention or hyperactivity indicative of a genetic defect, or was it merely the expression of normal behavior or a reaction to stress? Most important, were there alternative treatments that could help children thrive without resorting to powerful prescription drugs? In an effort to answer these questions, Wedge published an article in Psychology Today entitled "Why French Kids Don't Have ADHD" in which she argued that different approaches to therapy, parenting, diet, and education may explain why rates of ADHD are so much lower in other countries. In A Disease Called Childhood, Wedge further examines how myriad factors have come together, resulting in a generation addictied to stimulant drugs, and a medical system that encourages diagnosis instead of seeking other solutions. Writing with empathy and dogged determination to help parents and children struggling with an ADHD diagnosis, Wedge draws on her decades of experience, as well as up-to-date research, to offer a new perspective on ADHD. Instead of focusing only on treating symptoms, she looks at the various potential causes of hyperactivity and inattention in children and examines behavioral and environmental, as opposed to strictly biological, treatments that have been proven to help. In the process, Wedge offers parents, teachers, doctors, and therapists a new paradigm for child mental health -- and a better, happier, and less medicated future for American children
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
618.92/8589
Index
index present
LC call number
RJ506.H9
LC item number
W432 2015
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
A disease called childhood : why ADHD became an American epidemic, Marilyn Wedge, PhD
Label
A disease called childhood : why ADHD became an American epidemic, Marilyn Wedge, PhD
Publication
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 237-242) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
Introduction: A season in childhood -- What is ADHD? -- A tale of many cultures -- How a diagnosis became an epidemic -- Big pharma and biological psychiatry -- The message in the media -- Why American schools have to change -- Let food be thy medicine -- Tweens, teens, and screens -- Time-tested tactics for good parenting -- Protecting children in the age of Adderall
Control code
ocn896806827
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://secure.syndetics.com/index.aspx?type=xw12&client=780-496-1833&isbn=9781583335635&upc=&oclc=%28OCoLC%29896806827/LC.JPG
Dimensions
22 cm.
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'ALL_BRANCHES': 'https://tccl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/3204500063'}
Extent
xxii, 250 pages
Isbn
9781583335635
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2014045248
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)896806827

Library Locations

  • African-American Resource CenterBorrow it
    1520 North Hartford, Tulsa, OK, 74106, US
    36.177425 -95.984795
  • American Indian Resource CenterBorrow it
    2224 West 51st Street, Tulsa, OK, 74107, US
    36.089493 -96.017975
  • Bixby LibraryBorrow it
    20 East Breckenridge, Bixby, OK, 74008, US
    35.941196 -95.882858
  • Broken Arrow LibraryBorrow it
    300 West Broadway, Broken Arrow, OK, 74012, US
    36.052799 -95.793762
  • Brookside LibraryBorrow it
    1207 East 45th Place, Tulsa, OK, 74105, US
    36.098392 -95.976791
  • Central LibraryBorrow it
    400 Civic Center, Tulsa, OK, 74103, US
    36.150291 -95.994675
  • Charles Page LibraryBorrow it
    551 East 4th Street, Sand Springs, OK, 74063, US
    36.14093 -96.102013
  • Collinsville LibraryBorrow it
    1223 Main, Collinsville, OK, 74021, US
    36.364716 -95.839783
  • Community Outreach and Literacy ServicesBorrow it
    2901 South Harvard, Tulsa, OK, 74114, US
    36.126396 -95.850967
  • Genealogy CenterBorrow it
    8316 East 93rd Street, Tulsa, OK, 74133, US
    36.026527 -95.882851
  • Glenpool LibraryBorrow it
    730 East 141st Street, Glenpool, OK, 74033, US
    35.959007 -95.999352
  • Hardesty Regional LibraryBorrow it
    8316 East 93rd Street, Tulsa, OK, 74133, US
    36.026527 -95.882851
  • Herman and Kate Kaiser LibraryBorrow it
    5202 South Hudson Avenue, Suite B, Tulsa, OK, 74135, US
    36.087879 -95.913635
  • Hispanic Resource CenterBorrow it
    2601 South Garnett Road, Tulsa, OK, 74129, US
    36.126396 -95.850967
  • Jenks LibraryBorrow it
    523 West B Street, Jenks, OK, 74037, US
    36.024796 -95.975784
  • Judy Z. Kishner LibraryBorrow it
    10150 North Cincinnati Avenue E, Tulsa, OK, 74073, US
    36.307392 -95.991371
  • Kendall Whittier LibraryBorrow it
    21 S. Lewis, Tulsa, OK, 74104, US
    36.15889 -95.957886
  • LibrariumBorrow it
    1110 South Denver Ave., Tulsa, OK, 74119, US
    36.145419 -95.992799
  • Martin Regional LibraryBorrow it
    2601 South Garnett Road, Tulsa, OK, 74129, US
    36.126396 -95.850967
  • Maxwell Park LibraryBorrow it
    1313 North Canton, Tulsa, OK, 74115, US
    36.174 -95.918648
  • Nathan Hale LibraryBorrow it
    6038 East 23rd Street, Tulsa, OK, 74114, US
    36.129539 -95.905617
  • Owasso LibraryBorrow it
    103 W. Broadway, Owasso, OK, 74055, US
    36.266193 -95.855667
  • Peggy Helmerich LibraryBorrow it
    5131 East 91st Street, Tulsa, OK, 74137, US
    36.032127 -95.918701
  • Pratt LibraryBorrow it
    3219 South 113th W Avenue, Sand Springs, OK, 74063, US
    36.115589 -96.119003
  • Rudisill Regional LibraryBorrow it
    1520 North Hartford, Tulsa, OK, 74106, US
    36.177425 -95.984795
  • Schusterman-Benson LibraryBorrow it
    3333 East 32nd Place, Tulsa, OK, 74135, US
    36.116108 -95.938911
  • Skiatook LibraryBorrow it
    316 East Rogers, Skiatook, OK, 74070, US
    36.368568 -95.998375
  • South Broken Arrow LibraryBorrow it
    3600 South Chestnut, Broken Arrow, OK, 74011, US
    36.016449 -95.818459
  • Suburban Acres LibraryBorrow it
    4606 North Garrison, Tulsa, OK, 74126, US
    36.22065 -95.987175
  • Zarrow Regional LibraryBorrow it
    2224 West 51st Street, Tulsa, OK, 74107, US
    36.089493 -96.017975
Processing Feedback ...